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Scapulohumeral periarthritis (periarthritis)

IVRJoint rehabilitationScapulohumeral periarthritis (periarthritis)

80% of cases of shoulder pain are associated with such disease as scapulohumeral periarthritis. Scapulohumeral periarthritis (periarthrosis) is an aseptic inflammation of the shoulder tendons, ligaments, joint capsules, etc.

Causes of scapulohumeral periarthritis

The progress of the disease is often associated with the consequences of trauma in young adults under the age of 30, and in older people – with degenerative processes in the shoulder muscular cuff tendons. The pain is constant and dull, typically aggravating by upper limb movements. In the absence of competent treatment, the disease may eventually lead to significant limitation of motion.

Symptoms of scapulohumeral periarthritis

The disease is characterized by 3 stages of development:

  1. The initial stage of “freezing” phase starts with dull pain and acute inflammation of the shoulder joint and the nerve even at rest. The pain will often become more widespread and much worse at night. This phase can last between 2 and 9 months.
  2. The frozen or “sticky” phase involves restraint of movement almost in all directions, especially during rotation. This phase can last between 3 and 9 months.
  3. Thawing or regressive phase is characterized with deceptive decrease in shoulder pain, while the range of movement decreases and can lead to total stiffness of the shoulder – adhesive capsulitis. The third phase can last from 12 to 24 months.

Treatment options for scapulohumeral periarthrosis at the Center for Spine Strengthening and Joint Rehabilitation at the Institute of Vertebrology and Rehabilitation 

Patients suffering from pain should make an appointment with a professional vertebrologist. After an individualized consultation, the doctor can prescribe shockwave therapy, laser therapy or electrotherapy for tissue regeneration, injection therapy for inflammation relief or therapeutic massages for relief of stiffness of the neck muscles.

In cases when in the course of treatment doctors observe certain cessation of inflammatory processes, they can recommend the David Finnish-German kinesiotherapy. The David method maintain tone in the upper limb muscles and provide sufficient amounts of nutrients for ligaments and joints with the help of controlled exercises.

During the first visit to the Center for Spine Strengthening and Joint Rehabilitation with a view to recover from scapulohumeral periarthritis the patients undergo computer-based testing under the supervision of a rehabilitation professional with special medical training stimulators. After testing, a kinesiotherapy program with individual weight load for every patient is developed based on the Finnish-German David method.

For the treatment of scapulohumeral periarthrosis our Center uses the David Shoulder Concept equipment, consisting of 6 medical training stimulators designed for the upper limbs. All training stimulators are purpose-specific and stabilize the joints of the upper limbs at correct angles for high-level, yet safe exercise.

F420 DMS-EVE

The F420 DMS-EVE stimulator is used to train the latissimus dorsi, greater teres muscle, biceps and deep shoulder muscles.

F430 DMS-EVE

The F430 DMS-EVE stimulator is used to train deltoid and trapezius back muscles. The stimulator is equipped with easily adjustable arm supports for patients of all heights and sizes.

F500 DMS-EVE

The F500 DMS-EVE stimulator is used to train greater and smaller pectoral muscles. The stimulator is equipped with easily adjustable arm supports, contoured seat and back support for even more convenience and safety.

F510 DMS-EVE

All training stimulators are equipped with an inertial mechanism allowing for control of acceleration, deceleration and speed of motion during exercise.

F620 DMS-EVE

The F620 DMS-EVE stimulator is used to train the lateral deltoid, trapezius and supraspinatus muscles.

M62

The M62 stimulator is used for work-outs of biceps and triceps and improvement of intramuscular coordination.

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